The school newspaper of Oakville High School

myOHSonline

The school newspaper of Oakville High School

myOHSonline

The school newspaper of Oakville High School

myOHSonline

Women of the Match

Football team gains two female members
Myesha+Dickens+%2812%29+walks+down+the+track+with+her+family+during+football%E2%80%99s+Senior+Night.+%E2%80%9CIt+was+really+cool+being+recognized+and+having+a+lot+of+people+supporting+me+for+my+decision%2C%E2%80%9D+Dickens+said.+Though+she+was+worried+of+what+everyone+would+think%2C+Dickens+has+had+a+great+experience+on+the+team+and+only+regrets+waiting+to+do+so.+
Alyssa Johnston
Myesha Dickens (12) walks down the track with her family during football’s Senior Night. “It was really cool being recognized and having a lot of people supporting me for my decision,” Dickens said. Though she was worried of what everyone would think, Dickens has had a great experience on the team and only regrets waiting to do so.

As changes are made all around OHS, there’s one happening on our very own football field. Oakville is incorporating girls onto the football team, and they’ve gotten two to join already: Myesha Dickens (12) and Ahayla Crittendon (10). With change to such a classic sport, some players have to adapt to a situation different from their previous years playing.

“It’s definitely a fresh perspective,” Joe Romano (12) said. “We’ve never had a girl on the football team before and seeing them on there—it’s new for everybody, so it’s been an adjustment.”

An adjustment isn’t only being made by the guys, as the girls are also adjusting to the football setting.

“I enjoy being a part of a team like that where everyone’s connected,” Ahayla Crittendon (10) said. “I also enjoy doing something that I’ve never done before and that’s harder for me.”

Though it may be harder sometimes for the girls, the guys try to make sure to include and assist them.

“If I don’t understand, they’ll teach me,” Crittendon said. “They help me a lot.”

One of the ways the guys helped her was in the weight room.

“When I didn’t know how to do hang clings, they taught me how to do those,” Crittendon said, “and when I need a spotter, they always help me out.”

This help from the other team members does not go unnoticed by anyone involved.

“We’re all friendly with each other,” Romano said. “Just ‘hi’s’ and smiles.”

Though the team members may be smiling off the field, the smiles grow when they realize the impact the girls have against other teams.

“It’s just something that a lot of teams aren’t expecting to see,” Crittendon said. “Two girls on the sidelines—to see two girls dressed for the game.”

Despite proving their worth, the guys and girls alike acknowledge that girls are not yet fully integrated into the sport.

“I think we could definitely include them more into the program,” Caleb Pickens (11) said.

The further inclusion of girls into the football team is on many minds, knowing that the progress made is far from over.

“We bring a step in the right direction,” Crittendon said. “Where if girls want to play football, they can show up to the first practice to see if they like it, instead of being scared to try out.”

Despite the fear she felt, Crittendon pushed through and joined the team with a personal passion.

“A big part of the reason I joined is because of my dad,” Crittendon said. “My dad passed away a couple of years ago, and doing something that he did his whole life and loved makes me feel closer to him.”

In addition to the personal victory she felt, Crittendon brings in another achievement in a male-dominated area.

“They (the girls on the team) bring a sense of empowerment…” Romano said. “Girls can do anything that they feel like they can do—it’s not just cut off for boys.”

This sentiment reaches audiences greater than just the OHS, with the ideal helping girls all over Oakville.

“It grows the community,” Pickens said. “Other people can be like them.”

Throughout all of the troubles and triumphs, Crittendon remains optimistic about her position on the team.

“It definitely is different being a girl on the football team,” Crittendon said, “but it is a lot of fun, and hopefully more girls will want to join.”

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Maddy Geisler, Design Editor-In-Chief
Hey there! I'm Maddy, and I'm a senior at Oakville High School. I'm the Design Editor-in-Chief of both the school's Tiger Paw yearbook and The Prowl newspaper. I love to write about the school and showcase the interesting talents, ideas and people within it.

Comments (0)

All myOHSonline Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *